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Friday Cocktail: the Gibson

Gibson

Wait, what is that? There’s an onion in my martini?!

This variation of the classic Martini is known as a Gibson. The most notable difference: the cocktail onion.

It is believed the drink originated in San Francisco in the 1890s, according to some sources. Others claim it originated in New York City. Perhaps the drink’s creation was inspired by the feminine ideal of the turn-of-the-century period known as the Gibson Girl. This crisp cocktail does have an aura of refined beauty.

What you’ll need:  Gin, Vermouth (Dry), and a cocktail onion.

Chill a 3 ounce martini glass in the refrigerator in advance or put some crushed ice in your glass with a little water and set it aside. In a shaker, pour 2 ounces gin and 1 ounce vermouth over cracked ice. Then shake (or stir) briskly.  Strain into your chilled glass. Garnish with one to three cocktail (or pearl) onions.

How I like it:

I prefer Bombay Sapphire Dry Gin together with Martini & Rossi Extra Dry Vermouth. I tend to like my martinis and Gibsons drier, so I use more gin and less vermouth than above. It’s interesting to note the difference in taste between a martini with olives and one with an onion or two. I find the Gibson drier and crisper. Try one and see what you think. Although I don’t necessarily advise eating the onion.

Remember, drink responsibly!

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